A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a graphene device that’s thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits. It easily switches from a superconducting material that conducts electricity without losing any energy, to an insulator that resists the flow of electric current, and back again to a superconductor — all with a simple flip of a switch. [Read More]

Reliable Quantum Computing Superconducting Qubit Array

A new level of reliability in a five-qubit array has been achieved by a team of physicists at UC Santa Barbara. This moves us a step closer to making a quantum computer a reality. A functional quantum computer is a dream of many physicists. Contrasted with regular computers, the quantum computer would use quantum bits, or qubits, which make use of the multiple states of quantum phenomena. When built, a quantum computer would have millions of times power at certain computations than today’s supercomputers. [Read More]

X-Ray Snapshots of Light-driven Superconductivity Captured

Scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have uncovered a key factor behind the emergence of superconductivity, the ability to conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency. Precisely timed pairs of laser pulses at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) triggered superconductivity in the copper-oxide material under investigation. Researchers took x-ray snapshots of its atomic and electronic structure as superconductivity emerged. The scientists found that so-called charge stripes of increased electrical charge vanished as superconductivity appeared. [Read More]

Asymmetric Scattering in Superconductor Dopants

Recently scientists have uncovered materials that can be converted from magnetic insulators or metals into Superconductors, capable of carrying electrical current with no energy loss. It is an extremely promising concept for zero-resistance electronics, energy-storage and transmission systems. Currently, in addition to keeping the materials very cold, a major step to achieving superconductivity is to substitute a different kind of atom into some positions of the “parent” material’s crystal framework. [Read More]