Meter-scale Optical Coherence Tomography Depth Barrier Broken

The first ever optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of cubic meter volumes have been produced, through an industry-academic collaboration. The advance could open up many new uses for OCT in industry, manufacturing and medicine. It also marks a milestone toward developing a high-speed, low-cost optical coherence tomography system on a single integrated circuit chip. James G. Fujimoto of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), said: 1.5-meter Area 3D OCT Optical coherence tomography, first invented by Fujimoto’s group and collaborators in the 1990s, is currently the gold standard of care in ophthalmology and is increasingly used in cardiology and gastroenterology. [Read More]

Nanoscale Optical Tomography Produces High-res 3D Images

Engineers will need a 3-dimensional image depicting how light interacts with objects on the nanoscale in order to design the next generation of optical devices, from efficient solar panels to LEDs to optical transistors. But the physics of light has thrown up a roadblock in traditional imaging techniques: the smaller the object, the lower the image’s resolution in 3-D. Now, engineers at Stanford and the FOM Institute AMOLF, a research laboratory in the Netherlands, have developed a technique that makes it possible to visualize the optical properties of objects that are several thousandths the size of a grain of sand, in 3-D and with nanometer-scale resolution. [Read More]