Diamond Nitrogen-vacancy Centers Power World's Smallest Radio Receiver

A tiny radio whose building blocks are the size of two atoms has been developed by Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds, it is the world’s smallest radio receiver. The device can withstand extremely harsh environments and is biocompatible, meaning it could work anywhere from a probe on Venus to a pacemaker in a human heart. [Read More]

Light Can Mold and Move Hydrogels

Using only light, hydrogels and be moved around and re-shaped, computer simulations done at the University of Pittsburgh have shown. Animals like the octopus and cuttlefish that transform their shape depending on their environment have long been the subject of interest for researchers. This is because mimicking similar biological responses in non-living organisms would have considerable implications in the medical arena. Using hydrogels, which are the materials that constitute most contact lenses and microfluidic or fluid-controlled technologies, such a biomimetic response has now been demonstrated. [Read More]