Graphene Quantum Dots Recycle Waste CO2 Into Fuel


Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots could represent a simple method for recycling waste carbon dioxide into valuable fuel, rather than releasing it into the atmosphere or burying it underground, say Rice University scientists.

Nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) are an efficient electrocatalyst to make complex hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide, according to the research team. Using electrocatalysis, Rice University materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan’s lab has shown the conversion of the greenhouse gas into small batches of ethylene and ethanol.

Though they don’t entirely understand the mechanism, the researchers found NGQDs worked nearly as efficiently as copper, which is also being tested as a catalyst to reduce carbon dioxide into liquid fuels and chemicals. And NGQDs keep their catalytic activity for a long time, they report.

Curb Your Carbon Dioxide

Atmospheric carbon dioxide rose above 400 parts per million earlier this year, the highest it’s been in at least 800,000 years, as measured through ice-core analysis.

said coauthor Paul Kenis of the University of Illinois.

[caption id="attachment_4058” align="aligncenter” width="680”]nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dot An illustration of a nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dot like those being tested at Rice University for use as catalysts. (Credit: Ajayan Group/Rice University)[/caption]

In lab tests, nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots proved able to reduce carbon dioxide by up to 90 percent and convert 45 percent into either ethylene or alcohol, comparable to copper electrocatalysts.

Quantum Dots

Graphene quantum dots are atom-thick sheets of carbon atoms that have been split into particles about a nanometer thick and just a few nanometers wide.

The addition of nitrogen atoms to the dots enables varying chemical reactions when an electric current is applied and a feedstock like carbon dioxide is introduced.

Each of these positions, depending on where nitrogen sits, should have different catalytic activity. So it’s been a puzzle, and though people have written a lot of papers in the last five to 10 years on doped and defective carbon being catalytic, the puzzle is not really solved.”

Co-lead author Rice postdoctoral researcher Jingjie Wu, says:

Ajayan notes that while electrocatalysis is effective at lab scales for now, industry relies on scalable thermal catalysis to produce fuels and chemicals.

Original Study: A metal-free electrocatalyst for carbon dioxide reduction to multi-carbon hydrocarbons and oxygenates

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